Tigra ladies’ bike

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Another stray joined the workshop recently. Actually not so recently after all.

As you can tell from the photos, this was a while back, when there was still sunshine and no snow!

Tigra is a historic Swiss manufacturer (I understand they disappeared in 2001, bought by Villger, another Swiss brand), which adds another local bicycle to my collection.

This one was left by the bins with flat tires, lots of cobwebs and wrongly adjusted this and that. Nothing major missing though (like saddle, wheels, pedals, handlebars etc.), so all it needs is a little TLC.

I love the frame colour. It’s a really electric blue-green which almost looks cromovelato. Really nice. The pictures below don’t do it justice.

The lugged steel mixte frame has the usual mistreatment scratches, but from being badly stored rather than well ridden. The “Tigra” decal from the down tube has disappeared, but the lettering is faintly visible.

I haven’t done any research, but judging from the components I would say this is an early 90s bike. STI shifters. Shimano STX hubs, no-name aero rims. The pedals seem to have been replaced relatively recently (these are the Decathlon variety, cheap but decent).

Gear shifters and brake levers were oddly inverted, which must have made braking tricky. Gears didn’t shift correctly (WD40 sorted that). One tire pumped up fine, the other needed a patch. One wheel needed a bit of truing, but nothing major. Re-greased the hubs and gave it a wash.

With very little effort, this middle-aged lady is back on her feet. What a shame to have thrown her in the bin!

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1930s Wonder tandem (update 1)

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While trying to find some info on the Wonder tandem, (it’s easier to research on the net in winter than brave a cold workshop), I came across this great forum, all in French, related to this manufacturer from St Etienne.

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Some fantastic advertising posters.

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A few pictures of tandems, but Ravat models, not Wonder. This one looks pretty similar to mine. Similar derailleur, “gents” saddle at the front, wider “ladies” saddle at the back, same tool pouch, mudguards, but it has a split down tube and the top tube carries through to the rear seat tube.

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From the look of these pedals, mine aren’t original.

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I imagine myself pretty much as the chap in the photo below, casually pointing out a route on a map to his female companion.

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I was curious why the chain goes all the way from the front chain ring to the freewheel on my tandem. Typically I have seen one shorter chain between chain rings, and another between the rear ring and the freewheel.

The advert above says that this is how Ravat tandems were deliberately designed, along with a short rear wheelbase and thin lateral tubes, which “improves stability, rigidity and performance”. That’s a bit of a vague claim, and I don’t see how the chain length would help with that, but when I ride it I guess I’ll decide for myself!

Once I start on the restoration in earnest, I’ll be sure to reach out to the forum members. Looks like the only place to go!

Treasure hunting

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I recently picked up a couple of cone spanners made by Sugino, the Japanese component manufacturer, at a second hand store in Switzerland.
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They are in immaculate condition and only the 13mm spanner seems to have ever been used (maybe once?).
Does anyone ever use the 14 or 16mm spanners? I have never owned a hub that uses them. Would be great if 13 and 15 came on a single spanner, as they seem to be the most common, but then they’d sell fewer tools!
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I already have a bunch of cone spanners but these will go nicely with my 1985 all-Japanese Fuji Del Rey. It has Sugino cranks after all. They are really nicely made, and in far better condition than the Fuji itself…
Any idea when they date from?
I’m guessing 80s-90s, as the internet isn’t yielding much in the way of info.
Remember, you can never have too many tools.
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Removable valve stem??

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I guess you have heard of a removable valve core, but what about an entire stem?

I recently added another abandoned bike to the workshop and while tending to the flat tire I noticed the inner tube held air, but that the valve stem came out of the inner tube if fiddled with (with an explosive release of tyre pressure too!).

While I assume this is a fault in the inner tube, on closer inspection, it doesn’t look like anything has torn or failed. The inner tube has two rubber joints, the second of which seems to hold the stem base. The upper seems just to hold it straight.

I have replaced the inner tube with a new one from Schwalbe, but can a removable valve stem really be a thing? Never seen this before.

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Bike sharing in China

Similar to my post on bike sharing in China from a couple of weeks back, here’s one better researched, and better written, from The Guardian:

Bike-sharing revolution aims to put China back on two wheels

Clearly I was very lucky to be there under blue skies!

An amazing way to get rid of rust!

Not really accessible to the home mechanic though… =)

Happy New Year everyone!

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Happy New Year readers.

I hope you have some great down time with family and friends over the holiday season and wish you all a happy, healthy and active 2017!